054: Want to know if your medical invention idea is a good one?

Want to know if your medical invention idea is a good one? (I’ve got a quiz for this…keep reading to take it)

When you’re first thinking of something to invent, a big question that comes up is “how do I know if my medical invention idea is a good one” I know several of you stumbled on a solution to a problem while others desperately needed a solution to a problem so you created one, and there are other scenarios. No matter what lead to your idea, it’s important to know the impact that it will have on the world not only how it will benefit or save so many lives but the economic impact of it too like how will it save hospital systems, insurance companies, and patients money, how large is the problem you’re solving and what’s the amount of money that you could make?

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I’ve put together a fun little quize and you should take it or tell someone you know that falls into any of these categories:

  1. Have an idea for a medical invention
  2. In the beginning stages of just getting started
  3. Been working on this idea for a while but not sure what to do with it
  4. Not sure what to do next
  5. Need funding for your project


I wouldn’t recommend this quiz for someone who’s pretty far along on their product like those who have

  1. Started clinical trials
  2. Raised significant funding
  3. They’ve already brought a medical product to market before

Great Ideas:

Here’s some inspiration for you. We’re going talk about some products that have been a huge help to society and were great ideas all because some people ran with their idea and took a chance on it. Will I be able to add yours to the list in the next 10 or 20 years? I hope so.

CT Scanners: random trivia here – did you know that the group that brought the CT scanner to market was also the Beatles record company? I didn’t until I started doing some research. The CT scanner made it possible to diagnose soft tissue injuries, anomalies, and was a way for healthcare providers to find out what was wrong without doing major exploratory surgery.

Then we have the devices that have lead us as humans to do almost the impossible.

It still amazes me that we can insert a catheter through the femoral artery in the thigh and access the heart to do a procedure. Not only is it minimally invasive but it’s just amazing!

Or, I had hip surgery a few years ago and it was done via arthroscope. They were able to access my joint and repair a labral tear through 3 access ports.

Now, your idea doesn’t have to be as grand as these, actually, most of the medical inventions that are making a difference are really simple and people all over the world can access them.

Think about how much we use band aids for instance and this is about as different from a CT scanner as you can get. They help to stop bleeding, keep out debris and germs, and help make the areas where we get those annoying blisters feel more comfortable. They also help keep infection out.

A thermometer is used practically every time a patient is examined. It’s evolved from mercury to electronic and there are different points on the body that it can be used but the principle remains the same.

So go find out how much impact your idea will have (and I promise there’s no questions about your IP).

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Then here’s another example of something that seems so simple that taken for granted but it’s made a big difference in the world – a pregnancy test. It wasn’t that long ago that women couldn’t find out if they were pregnant unless they went to the doctor.

If you think about it, simple devices allow for more access. Most of the world can use medical products that are really simple. Developing nations make up most of the population in the world and sometimes they don’t have access to the medical technology that countries like the US does. If devices are made so they can be used anywhere, in low power, or in the field, they have the potential to impact so many more than something like a CT scanner.

Now, of course more complex devices make a difference too. Think of something like an LVAD or left ventricular assist device that allows humans to live without a heart. There may not be as many patients benefiting from this but they’re sure glad they are.

Pediatric devices are desperately needed in the world because when children end up having problems, many times there aren’t devices that are sized appropriately for them so physicians end up modifying adult versions of the device in what’s called off label use. You may have heard of this for drugs. Like here’s an example of an off label drug – you’re tired but can’t fall asleep so you take some benadryl because you know that makes you drowsy. The FDA doesn’t cleared benadryl for a sleep aid just in the same way they have not cleared an adult medical device for use in a child. There’s always a risk in using a product off label but if there is nothing else, it can be a good solution.

So I’m curious what impact your idea could have on the world. Take the quiz to find out here!

No matter if your idea seems big or small, if it seems like it will have an amazing impact on the whole entire world or make life so much better for just a handful of people out there, it matters. It matters to the ones that need and that is a great thing.

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Host: Meghan Alonso
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Host Company: Imua Services
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All Podcasts:
iTunes: bitly.com/Inspire

Full Transcription:

Recorder: Are you ready to master the waves of medical device product development? Well wax up your surfboard because you are listening to inspired by Imua. Here is your medical device product development expert that Hawaiian hearted hostess who will help you hang ten. Meghan Alonso.

Meghan: E komo mai and aloha! You’re listening to inspired by Imua, where we help you master the waves of medical product development. Each week we interview guest that educate, guide and inspire to give you and your product the skills you need to hang ten. If this is your first time listening, Imua is spelled I-M-U-A and it’s a Hawaiian word. It means to advance forward with passion despite rough waves.  There are plenty of those in the medical product development but keep listening because each week we’ve got you covered.

Meghan: So today I’m gonna do something a little interesting and I’m gonna talk about something that comes up a lot and one thing that I hear a lot is how do I know if my medical invention idea is a good one? And I know several of you stumble to a solution to a problem you weren’t really looking for it and others desperately needed a solution so you have to create one and then there’s other scenarios too and no matter what led your idea it’s important to know if it’s gonna be a good one and if it’s worth it or not you know how many lives will benefit how many lives will save. What’s the economic impact of it all and will it save hospital systems or insurance companies or how save patients money, how large is the problem that you’re solving and then what can you make from it. So I put together a little quiz and before I put into that I’m gonna go over some fun things coming up soon so networking is really important for you to bring your idea to market no matter what’s stage you’re in you definitely got to be out there networking so I’ve got 2 events coming up for you if you’re gonna be on Minneapolis on April 13th I’m hosting a small meet-up there in the Day Block Bury in Minneapolis so you can find out more about that it’s at IMUA-SERVICES.COM/EVENTS you can read about it there and also if you’re gonna be in San Diego or you want to be in San Diego on May 1st to the 3rd my friend Joe is having his annual 10x medical devices conference there in San Diego it’s a great event lots of fun, great contents and there’s ice cream too. You can save 30 dollars off of your registration by using the promo code IMUA@CHECKOUT and you can get more details and register over at MEDICALDEVICEEVENTS.COM. Back to the quiz now I put together this quiz and it’s gonna help you figure out if you’re medical invention idea is a good one and if you fallen of any of these categories you should take it so if you have an idea for medical invention or maybe you’re just in the beginning stages and you’ve been or you have this idea for a while but you don’t know what to do with it and you’re not sure what to do next or you need funding to your project. This is all good stuff you should take this quiz now I wouldn’t recommend anyone take this quiz if you’ve start a clinical trials you know maybe you’re pretty far along in development this is for someone in the beginning or you’ve raised significant amounts of funding already or maybe you’ve done this already maybe you brought products to market. You know the drill you know what to do you know how to tell if your idea is a good one so this quiz isn’t for you. Alright so go take the quiz you can find out the quiz if you go to the link IMUA-SERVICES.COM/GOODIDEA so I’d for you to take that let me know what you think. Okay for some inspiration for you let’s take about some great ideas and these ideas and these ideas have just been a huge help to society and they all came about because someone had an idea and they took a chance on it you know they did something with it. And I want to able to add yours in this list maybe in the next 5 years or 10 or 20 years and I really hope so that would be cool case. A huge piece of medical equipment that was a great idea was CT scanner k told me that it was the same company that brought the CT scanner to market was also the Beatles record company so maybe you can thank the Beatles for the CT scanner I don’t know for sure what do you think? So CT scanners make it possible today to diagnose soft tissue injuries and anomalies and just a way for healthcare provider to find out what’s wrong before they have to do major exploratory surgery so that’s creating huge value for the medical system then we have devices that have led us as humans do almost the impossible like it’s I don’t know about you but it still amazes me today we can insert a catheter through the artery into the thigh and it goes all the way to artery all the way back to the heart where we can access the heart to do a procedure now not only is that minimally invasive it’s just amazing I still get chills when I hear stuff like that. I had hip surgery a few years ago and it was done via scope so they were able to access my hip joint and repair a liberal through 3 access ports you know they didn’t have to flay me open and that’s a relatively new innovation actually I was fortune enough that the doctor that I saw kinda spear headed that cause there was just scopic injury being done for shoulder and hey why can I do this with hips so he did it. I’m really happy that he did it not only he invent his own medical product but I have a great outcome because of it  now your idea doesn’t have to be a grand as these and actually most of the medical inventions that are making a difference in this world are really simple and people all over the world can access them if they’re really simple so think about how you use band aid for instance and that’s way different from CT scanner but band aids even though they’re simple they do a lot of good things they help stop bleeding they keep the germs out and they help make those way more comfortable and of course they keep infection out or what about the thermometer you know that’s use practically every time a patient is examined and this is evolve from the old school mercury thermometer to electronic thermometers from the head to the mouth or forehead I should say the principle remains the same it’s the same technology that was a great idea. Here’s another example of something that’s simple and we often take for granted now but it’s made a big difference is a pregnancy test you know it wasn’t too long ago that women couldn’t find out that they’re pregnant unless they went to the doctor and now we just find out in the privacy of our own homes or wherever we’re at. So like I mentioned if you think about it simple devices allow for more access most of the world can use these products that are really simple like developing nations make up most of the population this world and a lot times they don’t have access in the medical technology that companies like the US does you know they don’t have access to CT scanner everywhere if devices are made so that they’re simple they can be used anywhere maybe there are low power or they’re durable they can be carried on the field on batteries or maybe they’re like paper or based diagnostics they have a potential to have a huge impact and be a great idea as well just as great as that huge CT scanner. Now I’m not dogging in these complex medical devices of course they make a difference too so think about something like an ALVAD or ABDOMINAL LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE this allows humans to live without a heart and there not be as many patients benefiting from these technology but I guarantee you they are glad that they have it for sure and last week I was actually at medtech innovator event it was a really great event there was some people pitching there or pediatric devices and pediatric devices even though they are pitch market they are definitely needed to the world because when children end up having problems many there’s not devices that are size appropriately for smaller bodies so physicians end up modifying adult version of the devices that’s what we call off label use so you may have heard of this before but you usually associate it with drugs like here’s an example so you’re tired and you can’t fall asleep and you take some Benedril because you know Benedril makes you drowsy and it put you asleep but in reality the FDA hasn’t cleared Benadril for sleep aid you know it’s clear it help for your allergy this is the same thing as maybe a pace maker  you know it’s been cleared for adult it’s been tested in certain patient populations but it hasn’t been tested on children so when the physician is placing that on a child it’s being modified it’s being off label use and there’s always a risk but when there’s nothing else you have to come up with a solution so a lot of times ideas like these can be great ideas so I’m curious what impact your idea could have on the world. I’m curious is a good idea or not so I really want you to take this quiz and don’t worry no matter if you’re ideas seems big or if it seems small or maybe you think it will have huge impact or maybe you think it’s just gonna impact it as small pitch of people you know it matters if you’re saving one life and that’s amazing so I want you to go take the quiz you can get it at IMUA-SERVICES.COM/GOODIDEA and just a reminder IMUA is spelled I-M-U-A so I look forward to seeing your results if this doesn’t seem appropriate for you then please pass it along to someone that it does seem appropriate for you know someone that’s just starting out and they are just craving information they want to know about their idea they’re looking to validate it. Alright that’s it for today and until the next episode IMUA!

Mahalo for joining us. If you’re new to riding the waves of medical device product development, or if you’ve been in development for a while already, Inspired by Imua is here to surf with you. Want to be a master of the waves? Text hang ten that’s all one word HANGTEN to 44222. We’ll send you the most common wipe outs companies make in product development so you can avoid them and reach master wave status. Again, that’s HANGTEN to 44222. We publish a new episode every Tuesday, so catch us at Inspiredbyimua.com. Imua!

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