061: Pitch contest and tips for pitching to celebrate my birthday

It’s my birthday June 11 and I want to celebrate by helping others and have a fun contest going on. The winner will receive a pitch makeover or get help putting their pitch together if they don’t have one yet. I cover the details in this episode + I give some tips on pitching based on my experience and from working with the original Shark from Shark Tank, Kevin Harrington when we wrote our book “Put a Shark in Your Tank” together.

Here’s how the contest works:

Click here to enter

  1. Record a short video on why you should win a pitch makeover or why you want a pitch that’s going to help you win competitions. Upload that video to youtube on a public setting
  2. Enter the contest above by clicking the link. You’ll enter your name, your email, and add the URL of your youtube video
  3. You’ll receive a confirmation with instructions on how to SHARE IT.
  4. The person with the most social shares (this is you sharing, your friends, family, and co-workers sharing) by June 12 wins.
  5. I’ll announce the winner on my Facebook Live video Q&A podcast on June 12 at 5pm Eastern. Like us on Facebook here so you can watch

Click here to enter

Here’s the pitching tips we cover in this episode

  1. Body language: You’ve got to convey confidence in yourself and your idea / technology when you’re pitching. People can be sharks and poke holes in your pitch if they feel you don’t have a solid foundation. Make sure you not only have one but you own it and project this
  2. Your story: You’ve got to somehow tie your idea or technology to a story that will resonate with those you’re pitching with. This brings out the emotional side and also builds their confidence in investing their money in you. An idea can be wonderful but if investors aren’t confident in who’s driving that idea forward, it can result in no investment
  3. Keep it succinct: You don’t want information overload here. Also — for those of you who are engineers or scientists — stick to the layman’s terms. If investors don’t understand your idea or technology then they won’t invest in it. Develop a way to clearly communicate it quickly.
  4. Tease, Please, Sieze: Kevin Harrington from Shark Tank taught me this and you can learn more in our interview together here. You’ve got to present the idea as the problem that’s out there and get the investors excited about it. You then please them with the solution demonstrating how you and your idea / technology specifically solves that problem, then you seize the opportunity in asking them to invest.
  5. The investors are your customers: When you’re in a pre-revenue state seeking funding, and especially when you’re pitching, you want to please the investors. You’re not selling the product here…. you’re selling yourself and your team. Remember that when you’re pitching and look at everything from the investor perspective. Think about what they would want and build your pitch accordingly.

Click here to enter

 

Host: Meghan Alonso
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Host Company: Imua Services
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About the Author

Meghan M. Alonso
Meghan M. Alonso, referred to by Shark Tank’s Kevin Harrington as a medical device development expert, is known for her award winning medical device podcast, Inspired by Imua, the chapter she wrote in best selling book “Put a Shark in Your Tank, and her valuable connections in the medical industry. According to the Huffington Post, she helps clients navigate the complicated process of bringing their ideas to the marketplace. She’s a patriotic military wife, pet parent, founder and co-founder of 4 successful companies who thrives on guiding medical device and IVD companies through development and manufacturing. When she isn’t helping others, Meghan is hard at work on her MBA she is pursuing from Auburn University, staying active with her adorable husky Abby, crossfitting, enjoying great restaurants and fine wine with her husband, and soaking up the sun the nearest beach.

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